On the seriousness of life

I find it slightly ironic that the author of Peter Pan had this to say about life, given the fact that ‘Peter Pan Syndrome’ is a key part of our cultural jargon today:

 

‘The life of every man is a diary in which he means to write one story, and writes another; and his humblest hour is when he compares the volume as it is with what he vowed to make it.’

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Things worth considering

I work for a state agency in Texas. Our assistant commissioner for our agency likes to send out weekly bulletins. I like his writing, and I like him. He’s a smart guy. He also understands the ‘structure’ of governmental agencies, and how things can be slow to change…….even when you want them to hurry up!  This is an excerpt from his bulletin sent this week…..I like it.

“Many of you know Cassini as the space probe launched in 1997 and arriving in orbit around Saturn in 2004.  The pictures returned from this probe are amazing (just go on-line to view) along with the scientific data.  The mission ended on September 15th of this year as the spacecraft coordinators sent Cassini into a final dive into Saturn’s atmosphere.

Aside from the incredible scientific and space exploration accomplishments, Cassini demonstrated a principle of patience.  From launch to arrival at Saturn took 6 years/225 days, the mission itself lasted 19 years/335 days.  An employee with NASA would’ve had to spend 20 years in the same area to participate in mission launch to mission completion (this does not include the frontend concept, design and build or post mission data analysis components of the accomplishment).

I note the above to raise and emphasize the advantages of patience, perseverance and time…….”

Life in the Now

{Although a bit stale, here is a bit from a NY times article published March 15th of last year}

 

Article’s Title: ‘The Shame Culture’ (speaking of ‘life’ via the internet these days)

“……….people are extremely anxious that their group might be condemned or denigrated. They demand instant respect and recognition for their group. They feel some moral wrong has been perpetrated when their group has been disrespected, and react with the most violent intensity.

Crouch describes how video gamers viciously went after journalists, mostly women, who had criticized the misogyny of their games. Campus controversies get so hot so fast because even a minor slight to a group is perceived as a basic identity threat.

The ultimate sin today, Crouch argues, is to criticize a group, especially on moral grounds. Talk of good and bad has to defer to talk about respect and recognition. Crouch writes, “Talk of right and wrong is troubling when it is accompanied by seeming indifference to the experience of shame that accompanies judgments of ‘immorality.’”

 

I should point out that a writer with the NY Times was touting (in a positive light) an article that was ultimately published in Christianity Today……heck, that’s worth noting alone!

I find it funny (if not bizarre) that there are no more ‘fringe’ groups anymore!  Every group/clique/cluster-of-minimally-meaningful-weirdos has now been legitimized via the digital ocean.

 

 

UC Berkeley riots night: Globalist dupes on parade

UC Berkeley riots last night: Globalist dupes on parade Shutting down free speech at the home of the Free Speech Movement The speaker canceled: Milo Yiannopoulos: gay, anti-Left by Jon Rappoport Fe…

Source: UC Berkeley riots night: Globalist dupes on parade

do not agree with everything this guy writes, but this article made me stop and think for a bit.

Something small….

I read an article today (at LinkedIn) about a manager refusing to engage in ‘Stack Ranking’ of employees. It was a good article, and although I’d heard of it, I was really unaware of how the practice worked. I work for a state agency, and I’ve heard that it’s been used here (but heck, raises come so infrequently around here, period….that it rarely even comes up!)

But, it made me remember something I used to do when I worked in healthcare administration. I used to like to do the old ‘Memo’ containing ‘Supervisor’s Expectations’ with many of my employees. It wasn’t ‘negative’ per se, or really even meant to be ugly, but now, with many years of life and working under my belt, I’ll say this: I wouldn’t do that kind of crap nowadays….I just wouldn’t. If you’re a good manager, and you know how to motivate people, just through talking and chatting, your people should know what’s expected of them…..without a silly memo.

It’s demeaning and as a minimum, pedestrian, to treat your people like that.

Just throwing out some gratitude

I work in Texas. Child Protective Services is really in the news these days around these parts. We read lots of things (positive AND negative) about families and children in the press since an (apparent) need for more spending in that department is present.

This is silly…..but I just feel grateful for all the good things my Mom did for me when I was a kid. I really miss her…..she died many years ago. But I just really miss her and wish I could hug her and tell her ‘thank you’ today for all the great stuff she did for me while I was growing up. The music lessons, the money for school trips, the clothes, the cooking, the shopping, the doctor/dentist/orthodontist visits, church, weekends, hugs, laughter, an attentive ear…….and so much more. Thank you, Mom. I miss you every day. When you were alive, I thanked you…..several times……but I just wish I could do so VERY LOUDLY today, right here where I am.

Interesting comment

While reading a WSJ article today about Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf defending the corporations’ actions in recent days, I was struck by a comment left by a reader at the end of the article:

“The legal, safety, environmental and quality control departments in corporations spend a lot of time making sure that high level executives are insulated from the undocumented pressure they put on lower level management to achieve revenue goals by any means. As long as branch managers (low-level scapegoats) get fired instead of people like Stumpf having charges brought against him, the implausible explanations for rampant consumer fraud will continue.

PS: The windows on many older GM SUVs shatter spontaneously (even while parked). Its not a common problem but known in the auto glass industry. GM knows about it. No recall……….  I guess they will wait until a kid in the back seat bleeds to death. I am sure the VP’s and CEO know nothing about the issue.”

Now, that little post-script rant….I’m not sure about that…..but I will say that the first part is VERY MUCH in keeping with my experiences (short-lived as they were) in corporate America are TOTALLY in keeping with that explanation. Everybody is ‘spinning’ to everybody else.